Knee Pain

Knee pain is a common complaint for many people. There are several factors that can cause knee pain. Awareness and knowledge of the causes of knee pain lead to a more accurate diagnosis. Management of knee pain is in the accurate diagnosis and effective treatment for that diagnosis. Knee pain can be either referred pain or related to the knee joint itself.

Knee osteoarthritis

Osteoarthritis is the most common type of arthritis. While it can occur even in young people, the chance of developing osteoarthritis rises after age 45. Women are more likely to have osteoarthritis than men.

Knee rheumatoid arthritis

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) happens when your body's defenses – your immune system – targets your joint linings. RA affects joints on both sides of the body, such as both hands, both wrists, or both knees. This symmetry helps to set it apart from other types of arthritis. It can also affect the skin, eyes, lungs, heart, blood, or nerves.

Osteomyelitis

Osteomyelitis is an infection of the bone, a rare but serious condition. Bones can become infected in a number of ways: Infection in one part of the body may spread through the bloodstream into the bone, or an open fracture or surgery may expose the bone to infection.

Gout

Gout is a common form of inflammatory arthritis - a condition affecting the joints and musculoskeletal system.

It is the most common form of inflammatory arthritis in men, and although it is more likely to affect men, women become more susceptible to it after the menopause.

The condition is characterized by sudden and severe pains, redness, and tenderness in the joints, most classically in the base of the big toe. When affecting the big toe, gout is sometimes called podagra.

These symptoms occur when uric acid, a normal product metabolism, is deposited in the form of needle-like crystals in tissues and fluids within the body.

The body views these crystals as foreign, and white cells infiltrate the joint, causing inflammation. Chalky deposits of uric acid known as tophi can also form as lumps under the skin surrounding the joints.